Digital Imaging: Close Up & Personal

Macro photography helps change your perspective of the world. You start looking at things on a smaller scale and even the smallest details take on meaning. Most cameras don’t like to get that close to subjects but you can overcome this by using magnifying filters.

My mom teaches a Jr. High photography class where they use point and shoot cameras (you can override many of the automatic features to take more control of your shots). I wanted to challenge myself and see if I could get quality shots with the same equipment they would use for her class that she can then use as examples. These images are from a combination of a Canon EOS REBEL T3i and a Panasonic DMC-FH25 on macro mode.

Close Up

alexismoser_elephantElephant CarvingCanon EOS REBEL T3i with a close-up filter.

This image was taken in class with a combination of ambient light and a continuous auxiliary light. I got down to the same level as the small elephant carving on the table to shoot at it head on. In Photoshop I used the adjustment layers to adjust for levels and hue and saturation. I also copied the original layer and added an unsharpen mask filter to bring out the wood texture, which I then blended using a mask. I then added a vignette.

 

alexismoser_asparagus3Asparagus Stalk – Panasonic DMC-FH25 on macro mode.

This image was taken in my kitchen using the regular overhead light and my desk lamp. I bounced the light from the lamp off of the white wall to soften the light. In Photoshop I cropped the image down a bit to get rid of a few tangents. I then used a vignette to bring the focus in on one stalk of asparagus. The best part of taking pictures of food is that you get to eat it afterwards.

 

alexismoser_coinsForeign Old Coins – Canon EOS REBEL T3i with a close-up filter.

This image was also taken in class with a combination of ambient light and a continuous auxiliary light. I used the adjustment layers in Photoshop to adjust for levels and hue and saturation. I copied the original layer and added an unsharpen mask filter and used a mask to take the effect of the surroundings. I then made another copy of the original layer and added a Gaussian blur filter, which I used a mask to undo the effect off of the coins and lowered the overall opacity of the layer. I cropped it down and then added a vignette.

 

Water Drops

alexismoser_pinkflowerdropsPink Flowers with Water – Canon EOS REBEL T3i with a close-up filter.

I took this image in class with mostly a continuous auxiliary light and some ambient light. A small spray bottle puts a dusting of water droplets on the petals. I used the adjustment layers in Photoshop to adjust for levels and hue and saturation. I changed the color slightly to be more of a red purple than blue. I finished by adding a vignette.

 

alexismoser_asparagusAsparagus with Water Drops – Panasonic DMC-FH25 on macro mode.

This image was also taken in my kitchen using my desk lamp. I used a spoon to slowly build small water droplets along the stalks. In Photoshop I copied the original layer and added an unsharpen mask filter and used a mask to take the effect of the surroundings. I used a vignette to finish. I do this by adding another layer and using the paint tool with black on a low opacity and flow.

 

alexismoser_asparagus2Asparagus with a Water Drop – Panasonic DMC-FH25 on macro mode.

I was trying really hard to get the stalks behind this one to show up in the water drop. That is one of the fun things about macro photography, is that you can see those small little details in even a tiny water drop. In Photoshop I cropped the image to get rid of an extra stalk that was in front, out of focus. I used a vignette to finish.

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